Luxury Scrambled Eggs with Cream Cheese and Spring Herbs

Luxury Scrambled Eggs with Cream Cheese and Spring Herbs
Copyright © 2007 Lynne Rossetto Kasper. All Rights Reserved

Serves 3 to 4

This is one place where a nonstick skillet makes life easier. Serve the eggs with a salad of tart greens (maybe the season's baby dandelions) and orange sections.

1 large whole scallion, thin sliced
1/2 tight-packed tablespoon curly parsley leaves, chopped
1/2 tight-packed tablespoon fresh basil or tarragon leaves, chopped
6 large eggs
2 tablespoons heavy cream
3 ounces cream cheese, cut into about 3/4-inch pieces
Salt and fresh-ground black pepper as needed
2 tablespoons butter

1. Combine the chopped herbs. In a medium bowl, use a fork to loosely combine the eggs and cream. Stir in cream cheese, the herbs, and a little salt and pepper. Eggs do not have to be completely blended.

2. In a 10-inch heavy nonstick skillet, melt the butter over medium heat. Add the eggs and stir with a spatula for a few seconds.

3. Lower heat to medium low and keep stirring, scraping up any egg sticking to the pan, for 3 minutes, or until large curds form. Eggs can be served almost wet, moist yet approaching firm (my preference), or quite firm. Serve hot.

LYNNE'S TIPS

The freshest organic eggs make a big difference in this recipe. Cash in on local farmers' food if you can.

For an extra-fancy presentation, borrow an old trick from French chef Michele Girard. Serve the eggs in their shells by carefully cutting away the top third of each shell, emptying out the egg, then sterilizing the shell in simmering water. Drain completely. Have egg cups handy. Stuff the hot eggs into the shells, mounding them high. Sprinkle with a little fresh herb for color and serve.
THOUGHTS FROM LYNNE

If you are looking for a great spring project, try building your own bread oven. Sculptor and oven builder Kiko Denzer has updated his book, Build Your Own Earth Oven (Hand Print Press, 2007, handprintpress.com). His mud oven templates are all about using what you have, spending little money, and creating far more than just a cooking implement.